andiphoto
andiphoto,foto estudio en A Coruña, España.
fotografía gastronómica, retratos, producto y catálogos
contacto en : info@andiphoto.es
http://www.andiphoto.es/
https://www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
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grofjardanhazy:

tastefullyoffensive:

The bathroom signs at Stormcloud Brewing Co. in Frankfort, MI. [x]

na jo, ez
grofjardanhazy:

tastefullyoffensive:

The bathroom signs at Stormcloud Brewing Co. in Frankfort, MI. [x]

na jo, ez
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alfadolls:

Natalia Skolimowska
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artchiculture:

by ryanmat
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grofjardanhazy:

Café de Unie
designed by Jacob Johannes Pieter Oud
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
1925

The building was destroyed during the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940, but it was rebuilt by Carel Weeber in another district  of the city in 1986.

____
The recent photo above was taken by Hans R. van der Woude, and the other images are from my personal collection.
grofjardanhazy:

Café de Unie
designed by Jacob Johannes Pieter Oud
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
1925

The building was destroyed during the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940, but it was rebuilt by Carel Weeber in another district  of the city in 1986.

____
The recent photo above was taken by Hans R. van der Woude, and the other images are from my personal collection.
grofjardanhazy:

Café de Unie
designed by Jacob Johannes Pieter Oud
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
1925

The building was destroyed during the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940, but it was rebuilt by Carel Weeber in another district  of the city in 1986.

____
The recent photo above was taken by Hans R. van der Woude, and the other images are from my personal collection.
grofjardanhazy:

Café de Unie
designed by Jacob Johannes Pieter Oud
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
1925

The building was destroyed during the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940, but it was rebuilt by Carel Weeber in another district  of the city in 1986.

____
The recent photo above was taken by Hans R. van der Woude, and the other images are from my personal collection.
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vivipiuomeno:

Bill Brandt (1904-1983)
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Door Handle | Walter Gropius | Bauhaus
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the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
the-gasoline-station:

Jean Nouvel’s Responsive Solar Facade at Institut du Monde Arabe
In the early eighties famed architect Jean Nouvel, in conjunction with Architecture-Studio, won the competition to design what would become the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA). It was conceived during the Grands Projets, a major development initiative headed by the French government, as a forum to explore the relationship of the Arab culture with France. Jean Nouvel, known for his innovative façade detailing, proposed an advanced responsive metallic brise soleil based on an archetypal element of Arabic architecture, the mashrabiyya. Drawing inspiration from the traditional lattice work that has been used for centuries in the Middle East to protect the occupants from the sun and provide privacy, Nouvel created a modular system of mechanized panels that could react dynamically to changing sunlight. Each made of several hundred light sensitive diaphragms, the panels could sensitively regulate the amount of light allowed to enter the building. During the various phases of the lens, a shifting geometric pattern of squares, circles, and octagons are formed and showcased as both light and void.
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Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
Paris HP5
© a. irrazabal
www.andiphoto.es
www.facebook.com/Andiphoto.es
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not-a-pretty-girl:

Ada Martini